“organizations for the protection of the frontier against Indian raids or Mexican marauders” (Gammel, Laws of Texas 1927)

PROPOSED CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT–AUTHORIZING LEGISLATURE TO GRANT CONFEDERATE PENSIONS REGARDLESS OF DATE PENSIONER CAME TO TEXAS OR WHEN WIDOW MARRIED PENSIONER OR WHEN SHE WAS BORN

H. J. R. No. 15.]

HOUSE JOINT RESOLUTION

[…]

Be it resolved by the Legislature of the State of Texas:

Section 1. That Section 51, Article 3, of the Constitution of the State of Texas by amended so as to read as follows:

[465] “The Legislature shall have no power to make any grant or authorize the making of any grant of public moneys to any individual, association of individuals, municipal or other corporations whatsoever; provided, however, the Legislature may grant aid to indigent and disabled Confederate soldiers and sailors under such regulations and limitations as may be deemed by the Legislature as expedient, and to their widows in indigent circumstances under such regulations and limitations as may be deemed by the Legislature as expedient; to indigent and disabled soldiers, who, under special laws of the State of Texas during the war between the States, served in organizations for the protection of the frontier against Indian raids or Mexican marauders, and to indigent and disabled soldiers of the militia who were in active service during the war between the States, and to the widows of such soldiers who are indigent circumstances, and who are or may be eligible to receive aid under such regulations and limitations as may be deemed by the legislature as expedient; and also grant for the establishment and maintenance of a home for said soldiers and sailors, their wives and widows and women who aided in the Confederacy, under such regulations and limitations as may be provided for by law; provided the Legislature may provide for husband and wife to remain together in the home…”

[466] […] [Note.— H. J. R. No. 15 was amended and passed the House February 16, 1927, 103 yeas, 5 nays; finally passed in the Senate March 10, 1927, 25 yeas, 0 nays.]

Approved by the Governor, March 30, 1927.

H. P. N. Gammel, The Laws of Texas, 1927: Supplement Volume to the Original Ten Volumes, 1822-1897 (Austin, Texas: Gammel's Book Store, 1927), 465 (link).

“If any free white person or persons shall play at any game with cards, or at any other game or games of chance with a slave or slaves, or a free person of color” (Texas Penal Code, revised 1860)

Article 1. Be it enacted by the Legislature of the State of Texas, That the following chapters and articles of the act above recited, commonly known as the Penal Code, be and they are hereby so amended, so as that the same shall read as follows, that is to say:

“An Act supplementary to and amendatory of an act entitled an act to adopt and establish a Penal Code for the State of Texas” (February 11, 1860), H. P. N. Gammel, The Laws of Texas, 1822-1897, Vol. 4 (Austin, Texas: Gammel's Book Store, 1898), 95/1457 (link).

TITLE 12.

Offences against public morals, decency and chastity.

[97/1459]

CHAPTER 6.

Of the crime against nature.

[…]

Art. 409a. If any free white person or persons shall play at any game with cards, or at any other game or games of chance with a slave or slaves, or a free person of color, he or they shall be fined not less than twenty nor more than one hundred dollars, or imprisonment in the county jail not more than three months, at the discretion of the jury.

TITLE 13.

Chapter 4.

Gaming.

[…]

“An Act supplementary to and amendatory of an act entitled an act to adopt and establish a Penal Code for the State of Texas” (February 11, 1860), H. P. N. Gammel, The Laws of Texas, 1822-1897, Vol. 4 (Austin, Texas: Gammel's Book Store, 1898), 96-97/1458-1459 (link).

 

“In the fall of that year I went to San Antonio and joined the Confederate Army” (Tafolla)

In 1862 I got a job at Camp Verde taking care of the camels the government had there, and I worked at it for about eight months. In the fall of that year I went to San Antonio and joined the Confederate Army, under the battalion of Col. Duff. During that winter, the battalion guarded the border from Laredo to San Antonio, and nearby points. From the very beginning, they assigned me to duty as a bugler, as they knew I had served in this role in the U.S. Army.

In Spring of 1863 we marched to Brownsville, and upon our arrival there, the battalion was merged into a regiment commanded by Col. Duff and Lt. Col. James Sweet. That year we guarded the border from the mouth of the Rio Grande in the Gulf of Mexico to Eagle Pass. Several times my company was assigned to the duty of guarding the place where the Rio Grande enters the Gulf.

[…]

[67] One of our men by the name of Manuel Menchaca, a native of San Antonio, mounted a horse he’d found staked out and pursued two of the men who were asleep in their hide-out in the sand dunes, where he captured them. He had a single-shot pistol, and each of them had a six-shooter.

Santiago Tafolla, A Life Crossing Borders: Memoir of a Mexican-American Confederate. Houston, Tex.: Arte Público Press. Edited by Carmen Tafolla and Laura Tafolla. Translated by Fidel L. Tafolla. 64, 67.

Notes with capsule bios of Juan N. Cortina and Col. Santos Benavides, LCB 121 n. 75 (Cortina), 76 (Benavides)

Joins U.S. 2nd Cavalry, spends 5 years fighting mainly in Comanche Wars, 1855-1860. 31-61.

Confederate military career as a whole, through desertion to Mexico: 64-80.

“That year I got 160 acres of land” (Tafolla)

In the same year, the war broke out between the United States and the Confederate States, and when the army was set to march out of the state of Texas, Sergeant McDonald deserted, came to where I was, and sold the cows. […] That year I got 160 acres of land, which was the amount the state of Texas was granting to every citizen who was a head of household. I built a ranch on a particular branch of Privilege Creek which is called Bear Creek. I lived there for some time with my brothers-in-law, who’d come to live with us there in Bandera County. J.P. Rodríguez had established a ranch on the main branch of Privilege Creek approximately two miles from mine.

Santiago Tafolla, A Life Crossing Borders: Memoir of a Mexican-American Confederate. Houston, Tex.: Arte Público Press. Edited by Carmen Tafolla and Laura Tafolla. Translated by Fidel L. Tafolla. 63.

Land: Tafolla qualifies for headright land 1861.